• Herbatonin 0.3mg

    • $14.99

Herbatonin®0.3mg is for people who have low melatonin production due to lifestyle or age and/or need support in aligning their circadianrhythm. Melatonin is a hormone released by the pineal gland in the brain to aid bio-rhythm regulation. Melatonin secretion is enhanced in darkness, decreased by light exposure and also declines with age. According to the Journal of Pineal Research 1995: 18: 28-31, Melatonin†:

  • Synchronizes circadian rhythms
  • Stimulates the immune system
  • Acts as a potent brain anti-oxidant

Melatonin works as an antioxidant, combating free radicals which can cause oxidative damage to our cells. Uniquely, it can also cross the blood-brain barrier, making it one of the most potent antioxidants in the brain. Most substances, including antioxidants that we consume, do not cross this barrier. Yet, the wisdom of nature has provided us the ability to manufacture this defense mechanism and may in part explain its benefit in support of cognition. Melatonin has been shown to support NF-kappa B, an important cellular signaling agent which regulates inflammation. Mitochondria, being the cellular source of energy are also the target of oxidative damage. The sensitive nature of mitochondrial membranes, which can be damaged by a plethora of factors, may be supported melatonin. Melatonin is selectively taken up by mitochondrial membranes, a function not shared by other antioxidants.

Important Notefor Adults and Parents

As per the labeling on our boxes, we do not recommend the use of melatonin with children under the age of 18. Children under the age of 18 naturally produce 2-3 times more melatonin than an adult. Melatonin is a hormone that our body produces naturally. Our body triggers its own production when it registers darkness. This happens through the retina in the eye, which signals the body’s own production of melatonin when it is in darkness. This means that if you are watching television, playing on the computer or have a night light on close to bed time you won’t be allowing your body to make and retain its own melatonin. For this reason we always recommend that you try going to sleep in darkness and doing relaxation/meditation exercises before you start to use melatonin.

In addition, make sure you actually need melatonin. If you exercise in the evening then sometimes cortisol production can peak late at night, impacting your sleep cycle making it hard to fall asleep. If you consume large amounts of sugars through food or soda it can disrupt your blood sugar and spike energy production late at night again making it hard to fall asleep. For more detailed information on all the potential causes of sleep issues click here

We always suggest starting with the lowest dose of 0.3mg and build up from there if necessary, as starting melatonin in high doses and trying to go off it in the future is much harder. For children, if a parent still decides to use melatonin we suggest working with your doctor closely. Please also feel free to contact our medical.team@naturalhi.comfor further support.

  • I had the fortune of learning about Natural Health International’s Herbatonin one day while at Whole Foods Market in NYC. I was so glad to find an alternative to the non-vegetarian and laboratory created Melatonin out there. I enjoy knowing that I am now taking a melatonin made from plants. I take Natural Health International’s 0.3mg strength Herbatonin® on an every night regular basis for its antioxidant properties and I take the 3mg strength at times when I need a healthy non-habit forming sleep aid. I find this product very effective and I feel good knowing that I am now taking a plant sourced melatonin.

    - Jill Srebnick

    New York, NY

Herbatonin® is a 100% natural plant extract from a particular variety of rice with a standardized level of 0.3mg of melatoninper capsule of Herbatonin®.

Herbatonin® is the only plant based melatonin on the market. All other melatonin is derived from the pineal gland of animals or synthesized in a laboratory.

 Herbatonin®Certificate of Analysis

 Herbatonin®is completely vegan and perfectly pure containing no magnesium stearate, silicon dioxide, fillers, chemicals, excipients or additives.Herbatonin®is packaged in oxygen barrier blister packs, which keep the product stable for up to 3 years. Herbatonin® isalso packaged invegan capsules,recycled boxeswhich are printed with vegetable ink,helping to protect the environment.

Herbatonin® or plant melatonin has been found in several plants (Dubbels et al., 1995; Hattori et al, 1995). The hormone is also present in algae, where its role may be acting as a phytohormone and anti-oxidant (Balzer and Hardeland, 1996). Amount varies in different species, from 0 to 800 pg/mg protein, with the highest amount found in rice family Gramineae.

The identity of plant melatonin was verified by HPLC. Biological and pharmacological identity with animal melatonin was demonstrated by activity in chicks and rabbits. Dietary (ingested) plant melatonin influences plasma levels and brain receptor binding. Some selected references related to the existence of plant melatonin and the action of Melatonin in in-vivo laboratory models and in humans are included below:

  • Agorastos AHuber CG. The role of melatonin in glaucoma: implications concerning pathophysiological relevance and therapeutic potential. J Pineal Res. 2011 Jan;50(1):1-7.
  •  Arendt, J. (1994) Human responses to light and melatonin, pp 439-442 in: "Advances in Pineal Research", Vol 8, Eds: M. Moller and P. Pevet, J. Libbey, London.
  •  Arendt, J. (1995) Significance of melatonin in humans, pp 165-171 in: "The Pineal Gland and its Hormones" Eds: Fraschini, F., Reiter, R.J. and Stankov, B., Plenum Press, New York.
  •  Armstrong, S. M. (1991) Treatment of sleep disorders by melatonin administration, pp 263-274 in: "Advances in Pineal Research," Vol.6, Eds: A. Foldes and R. J. Reiter, John Libbey, London.
  •  Aversa S, et al. Potential utility of melatonin as an antioxidant during pregnancy and in the perinatal period. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2011 May 11. [Epub]
  •  Balzer, I. and Hardeland, R. (1996) Melatonin in algae and higher plants - possible roles as a phytohormone and antioxidant. BotanicaActa 109: 180-183.
  •  Blask, D.E. and Wilson, S.T. (1995) Melatonin action on human breast cancer cells: involvement of glutathione metabolism and the redox environment. pp 209-217 in: "The Pineal Gland and its Hormones" Eds: Fraschini, F., Reiter, R.J. and Stankov, B., Plenum Press, New York.
  •  Cagnoni, M.L., Lombardi, A., Cerinic, M.C., Dedola, G.L. and Pignone, A. (1995) Melatonin for treatment of chronic refractory sarcoidosis, Lancet, 346 (8984): 1229-1230.
  •  Chan, T.Y. and Tang, P.L. (1995) Effect of melatonin on the maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis in the rat, Endocrine Res. 21: 681-696.
  •  Chaste P.et al. Genetic variations of the melatonin pathway in patients with attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorders. J Pineal Res. 2011 Apr 27. [Epub]
  •  Dubbels, R., Reiter, R.J., Klenke, E., Goebel, A., Schnakenberg, E., Ehlers, C., Schiwara, H.W. and Schloot, W. (1995) Melatonin in edible plants identified by radioimmunoassay and by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, J. Pineal Res. 18: 28-31.
  •  Escames G, et al. The role of mitochondria in brain aging and the effects of melatonin.CurrNeuropharmacol. 2010 Sep;8(3):182-93.
  •  Folkard, S., Arendt, J. and Clark, M. (1993) Can melatonin improve shiftworkers tolerance of the night shift? Some preliminary findings, Quoted in Arendt, J (1994) Human responses to light and melatonin Advances in Pineal Research, Vol 8, Eds: M. Moller and P. Pevet, J. Libbey, London.
  • Furio AM, et al. Possible therapeutic value of melatonin in mild cognitive impairment: a retrospective study. J Pineal Res. 2007 Nov;43(4):404-9.
  • Guardiola-Lemaitre, B. (1994) Melatonin agonist/antagonist: from the receptor to therapeutic applications, in: "Advances in Pineal Research", Vol 8, Eds: M. Moller and P. Pevet, pp 333-348, J. Libbey, London.
  • Hattori, A., Migitaka, H., Iigo, M., Itoh, M., Yamamoto, K., Ohtani-Kaneko, R., Hara, M., Suzuki, T. and Reiter, R.J. (1995) Identification of melatonin in plants and its effects on plasma melatonin levels and binding to melatonin receptors in vertebrates, Biochem. Mol. Biol. Int. 35: 627-634.
  • Iguchi, H. et al. Age-Dependent Reduction in Serum Melatonin Concentrations in Healthy Human Subjects. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology& Metabolism. July 1, 1982 vol. 55 no. 1 27-29.
  • Jean-Louis G, et al. Melatonin effects on sleep, mood, and cognition in elderly with mild cognitive impairment. J Pineal Res. 1998 Oct;25(3):177-83.
  • Kaczor, T. An Overview of Melatonin and Breast Cancer. Natural Medicine Journal 2010 Feb.[Epub]
  • Koziróg M, Melatonin treatment improves blood pressure, lipid profile, and parameters of oxidative stress in patients with metabolic syndrome. J Pineal Res. 2011 Apr;50(3):261-6. Epub 2010 Dec 8.
  • Knutsson, A. Health disorders of shift worker. Occupational Medicine 2003;53:103–10
  • Lewy AJ, Low, but not high, doses of melatonin entrained a free-running blind person with a long circadian period. Chronobiol Int. 2002 May;19(3):649-58.
  • Lissoni, P., Barni, S., Fossati, V.,Ardizzoia, A., Cazzaniga, M, Tancini, G., and Frigerio, F. (1995) A randomized study of neuroimmunotherapy with low dose subcutaneous interleukin-2 plus melatonin compared to supportive care alone in patients with untreatable metastatic solid tumour, Support Care Cancer, 3: 194-197.
  • Maestroni, G.J.M., Conti, A. and Covacci, V (1994) pp 73-81 in: "Advances in Pineal Research" vol 7, Eds: Maestroni, G.J.M., Conti, A and Reiter, R.J. John Libbey, London.
  • Melke J, et al. Abnormal melatonin synthesis in autism spectrum disorders. Mol Psychiatry. 2008 Jan;13(1):90-8. Epub 2007 May 15.

  • Nagtegaal.E., Smits, M., Swart,W., van der Meer, G., and Kerkhof, G.(1995) Melatonin secretion and coronary heart disease, Lancet 346 (8985): 1299.
  • Negi GKumar ASharmaSS.Melatonin modulates neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in experimental diabetic neuropathy: effects on NF-κB and Nrf2 cascades. J Pineal Res. 2011 Mar;50(2):124-31.
  • Oaknin-Bendahan, S, Anis, Y, Nir, I &Zisapel, N.(1995) Effects of long-term administration of melatonin and a putative antagonist on the ageing rat, Neuroreport, 6: 785-8.
  • Ochoa JJ, Melatonin supplementation ameliorates oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling induced by strenuous exercise in adult human males. J Pineal Res. 2011 Apr 21. [Epub]
  • Olcese JM, et al. Protection against cognitive deficits and markers of neurodegeneration by long-term oral administration of melatonin in a transgenic model of Alzheimer disease. J Pineal Res. 2009 Aug;47(1):82-96. Epub 2009 Jun 17.
  • Parkes, J.D. (1995) Melatonin and sleep, pp 183-198 in: "The Pineal Gland and its Hormones" Eds: Fraschini, F., Reiter, R.J. and Stankov, B., Plenum Press, New York.
  • Pierpaoli, W., Dall'Ara, A., Pedrinis, E., and Regelson, W. (1991) The pineal control of ageing. The effects of melatonin and pineal grafting on the survival of older mice, Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci, 621: 291-313.
  • RastmaneshR.Potential of melatonin to treat or prevent age-related macular degeneration through stimulation of telomerase activity.Med Hypotheses. 2011 Jan;76(1):79-85
  • Robinson, W.A., Dreiling, L., Gonzalez, R. and Balmer, C. (1995) Treatment of human metastatic malignant melanoma with highdose oral melatonin, pp 219-225 in: "The Pineal Gland and its Hormones" Eds: Fraschini, F., Reiter, R.J. and Stankov, B., Plenum Press, New York.
  • Rossignol DAFrye RE. Melatonin in autism spectrum disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Dev Med Child Neurol. 2011 Apr 19. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-8749.2011.03980.x. [Epub]
  • Srinivasan V, et al. Melatonin in mitochondrial dysfunction and related disorders.Int J Alzheimers Dis. 2011;2011:326320. Epub 2011 May 4.

  • Tractenberg RE, The Sleep Disorders Inventory: an instrument for studies of sleep disturbance in persons with Alzheimer's disease.J Sleep Res. 2003 Dec;12(4):331-7.

  • Vijayalaxmi, Reiter, R.J., Sewerynek, E., Poeggeler, B.. Leal, B.Z. and Meltz, M.L. (1995) Marked reduction of radiation-induced micronucleiin human blood lymphocytes pretreated with melatonin, Radiation Res. 143: 102 - 106.
  • Wetterberg, L. (1995) Seasonal affective disorder, melatonin and light, pp 199-208 in: "The Pineal Gland and its Hormones" Eds: Fraschini, F., Reiter, R.J. and Stankov, B., Plenum Press, New York.
  • Zee, PC, Goldstein, CA. Treatment of Shift Work Disorder and Jet Lag.Current Treatment Options in Neurology. 2010; 12:396–411
  • Zhdanova IV, et al. Melatonin Treatment for Age-Related Insomnia. J ClinEndocrinolMetab, October 2001, 86(10):4727–4730
  • Zhdanova IV, et al. Effects of a low dose of melatonin on sleep in children with Angelman syndrome. J PediatrEndocrinolMetab. 1999 Jan-Feb;12(1):57-67.

Herbatonin® is a 100% natural plant extract from a particular variety of rice with a standardized level of 0.3mg of melatonin per capsule of Herbatonin®.

 Herbatonin® is the first and currently only plant based melatonin on the market. All other melatonin is derived from the pineal gland of animals or synthesized in a laboratory. In addition unlike many other melatonin products

Herbatonin® is completely pure containing no magnesium stearate, silicon dioxide, fillers, chemicals, excipients or additives. Herbatonin® is packaged in oxygen barrier blister packs, which keep the product stable for up to 3 years. Herbatonin® is also packaged in vegan capsules, recycled boxes which are printed with vegetable ink, helping to protect the environment.

For information on how Herbatonin® compares to other sleep supplements and the various causes of sleep issues click here

The effective dose of Herbatonin® should be determined individually in consultation with your healthcare professional. Each desired therapeutic effect requires a specific dose based on your individual biological makeup.

We recommend the 0.3mg dose daily

1. Can I take Herbatonin0.3mg long term?

 Yes,Herbatonin®0.3mg is designed for long term use, specifically as an anti-oxidant.


2. Can I use Herbatonin® with my child?

As per the labeling on our boxes we do not recommend the use of melatonin with children under the age of 18. Children under the age of 18 naturally produce 2-3 times more melatonin than an adult.

 Melatonin is a hormone that our body produces naturally. Our body triggers its own production when it registers darkness. This happens through the retina in the eye, which signals the body’s own production of melatonin when it is in darkness. This means that if your child is watching television, playing on the computer, or have a night light on, close to bed time, their body will not trigger its own melatonin production. For this reason we always recommend that you try putting them to sleep in darkness and doing relaxation/meditation exercises to support their body’s own production of melatonin.

 In addition, if your child exercises in the evening sometimes cortisol production can peak late at night, impacting their sleep cycle making it hard to fall asleep. If they consume large amounts of sugars through food or soda, it can disrupt their blood sugar and spike energy production late at night again making it hard to fall asleep.

 If after trying the above you still decide to use melatonin with your child we suggest working with your doctor closely. Please also feel free to contact our medical.team@naturalhi.com for further support.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.